“George Peabody, a Massachusetts trader, set up a banking house – George Peabody & Co. – in London in 1837. He became regarded as a ‘financial ambassador in London. Carrol Quigley attributes the use of tax-exempt foundations for manipulation of society to Peabody, seen in his Illuminati Peabody foundation. Daniel Colt Gilman, a member of the Skull & Bones and first President of the Carnegie Institution, was involved in the establishment of the Peabody foundation. He was in such high regard by the elite that they have erected a statue of him across from the Bank of England.

Peabody was getting old and needed a younger partner. Junius Morgan, of Hartford, Connecticut, was recommended to Peabody. In 1854 Junius and his family arrived in London to join George Peabody & Co. When the elite’s concocted American Civil War broke out, Peabody and Junius Morgan raised loans for the North. It appears Junius played both sides of the war. Ralph Epperson claims Junius was one of the Rothschild agents who shipped supplies to the South. When Peabody retired in 1864 Junius took over the business. The firm was re-named JS. Morgan & Co. That same year Junius’s son, J.P. Morgan, became a junior partner in the firm. A year later J.P. left for America to represent the firm in New York. After the end of the Franco-Prussian War, Junius Morgan was called on to help restore the French economy. Around this time his bank was talked of as a rival to the Rothschild’s New Court, but Junius was a Rothschild agent. When he prospered, so did the Rothschild prosper and so did the Illuminati.

J.S. Morgan & Co. was one of the Rothschild’s great power tools in the United States. In 1869 Junius’s son, J.P. Morgan went to London to meet with the Rothschilds. They laid out the plans to form Northern Securities, a company that would act as an agent for New Court in the U. S. with J.P. ruling as a proxy for the family. In 1871 Junius’s son, J.P. Morgan made an alliance with Tony Drexel, heir to the powerful Philadelphia bank. Their firm – Drexel, Morgan & Co., resided in an extravagant new building on Wall St., which is still Morgan headquarters today. After the Europeans got over their lack of confidence at the end of the Civil War, money began to stream across the ocean to the U.S., providing massive profit for the firm. It set out to finance the growing number of industrial projects in America. The House of Morgan was getting extremely rich.”

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